Life's Race

By: Meghan Sheriff

Crossing the finish line at the Marine Corps Marathon in 2001 and then again in 2003 took grit, but it pales in comparison to the race I run on a daily basis. Most take for granted popping out of bed and hopping on a bike, or jumping on the James for a paddle; I relish in these activities because I know just how lucky I am to participate in them. For the past seven years, my biggest race, my toughest competitor, my hardest pupil, has been my own body. You see, I have MS, but MS does not have me.

  Being competitive is paramount in any work environment. It fuels the flames. It touches on our innermost human desire to excel and prosper. However, when our brains say one thing and our bodies say something else, this is a battle that has to be won on the daily.

  I was fortunate to be born to an educator. My mother, the physical education teacher and the coach, forever fanned my flames by practicing tough love. She instilled in my siblings and me a sense of get up and go. We are all entrepreneurs- one here and one across the globe in Australia. Our desire to persist and create is innate; it's ingrained in who we are, and that is why when asked- how competitive are you? I respond- what’s the challenge?

  Competitive drive does not come down to speed or endurance, it comes down to grit, creative thinking, and passion. It comes down to what makes a person get up and go, even when their body says it got up and went. It’s waving the white flag just for a moment, and then torching it and starting from scratch. Competition means learning from your mistakes and pushing harder the next time around. If life has taught me anything through the years, it is that the only way out is through.

  Additionally, being competitive means practicing what you preach and challenging yourself in new ways. This summer, I was fortunate enough to take my oldest son, Charlie, to Colorado for a week. We went white water rafting, climbing, mountain biking, and camped from desert to mountains. It was a trip of a lifetime, and one I will replicate with my younger sons with their chosen destinations, Peru and Alaska. These coming of age adventure trips are life changing. Likewise, spring break trips to the Gorge to climb with friends have shaped my sons into daring, fun-loving and thrill seeking young men. While most kids clung to their parents at camp drop off, my sons packed their bags and did not look back. I hope my competitive spirit to beat MS every, single day has instilled in my children the same desire to get the most out of life. Nothing is guaranteed.    One thing is certain- I want to climb, hike, paddle, and walk my way back to wellness. I want to win this race once and for all.



  Crossing the finish line at the Marine Corps Marathon in 2001 and then again in 2003 took grit, but it pales in comparison to the race I run on a daily basis. Most take for granted popping out of bed and hopping on a bike, or jumping on the James for a paddle; I relish in these activities because I know just how lucky I am to participate in them. For the past seven years, my biggest race, my toughest competitor, my hardest pupil, has been my own body. You see, I have MS, but MS does not have me.


  Being competitive is paramount in any work environment. It fuels the flames. It touches on our innermost human desire to excel and prosper. However, when our brains say one thing and our bodies say something else, this is a battle that has to be won on the daily.


  I was fortunate to be born to an educator. My mother, the physical education teacher and the coach, forever fanned my flames by practicing tough love. She instilled in my siblings and me a sense of get up and go. We are all entrepreneurs- one here and one across the globe in Australia. Our desire to persist and create is innate; it's ingrained in who we are, and that is why when asked- how competitive are you? I respond- what’s the challenge?


  Competitive drive does not come down to speed or endurance, it comes down to grit, creative thinking, and passion. It comes down to what makes a person get up and go, even when their body says it got up and went. It’s waving the white flag just for a moment, and then torching it and starting from scratch. Competition means learning from your mistakes and pushing harder the next time around. If life has taught me anything through the years, it is that the only way out is through.


  Additionally, being competitive means practicing what you preach and challenging yourself in new ways. This summer, I was fortunate enough to take my oldest son, Charlie, to Colorado for a week. We went white water rafting, climbing, mountain biking, and camped from desert to mountains. It was a trip of a lifetime, and one I will replicate with my younger sons with their chosen destinations, Peru and Alaska. These coming of age adventure trips are life changing. Likewise, spring break trips to the Gorge to climb with friends have shaped my sons into daring, fun-loving and thrill seeking young men. While most kids clung to their parents at camp drop off, my sons packed their bags and did not look back. I hope my competitive spirit to beat MS every, single day has instilled in my children the same desire to get the most out of life. Nothing is guaranteed.    One thing is certain- I want to climb, hike, paddle, and walk my way back to wellness. I want to win this race once and for all.


Richmond Rocks

By: Meg Sheriff


Life's Race

By: Meghan Sheriff

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